Tips On How To Tap Into Your Intuition

You are already intuitive. Allowing your mind to be conscious to this fact is where the development begins. At times, we find that we are in battle with heart and head but forget we have this powerful tool within us that can help us make the right choices without the ego or feelings getting in the way!

What is intuition exactly? Intuition connects us to who we truly are. It’s a range of experiences including the five senses and even our sixth sense, the one of feeling. Intuition can be that all-knowing feeling that something is wrong but you cannot figure out why. We’ve all had that feeling, but often we don’t trust it or listen even if it is screaming at us!

Here are some tips on how to tap into your instinct.

Remove your blocks

Go inwards when something ‘off’ arises, where you may not have been before. Do not see this block as a problem but an opportunity. If your mind is stressed, why is that? Slow down, feel, take your time and work through it.

Less ego

Our ego tends to appear when we are feeling vulnerable, insecure and not good enough. Your ego holds your opinions and judgements. As you catch your ego early, you can become less opinionated and judgemental. You will be less reactive and present when making your decisions.

Start small

Use your intuition to make small decisions first. That way, you have nothing to lose and only something to gain. Take it one step at a time. For instance, you could assess your food choices and what you intuitively know is a better decision. Practice small for the big decisions such as career, relationships and life changing choices.

Make better decisions and keep them

Everyday we are making innumerable decisions both consciously and subconsciously. Becoming more conscious of ourselves and decisions, we have a better opportunity to make better choices that align with our true self. Making decisions aligned with who we are, instantly help us make the right ones, which make us feel better, in turn encouraging us to keep doing them.

Listen to your gut, honour your intuition. Trust yourself.

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See the beauty, not the beast

When I stood on the scales after a year of chronic illness, never could I imagine that I would be 25 kilo’s heavier. Yes, 25 kg! Staring at the scales, I remember all of my confidence just dissipated. I had lost my spunk and instantly went into a funk.

Overcoming body shame is not an easy feat. Every time you look in the mirror or step on the scales, you can be shaken, disheartened and in some moments, start hating your body. We so easily forget that we have an incredible vessel that is guiding us through our life and often all we see is our own perceived inadequacies.

Has this happened to you? Perhaps you’ve hit a stage where you think your body is too big, too small, too fat, too thin, too young or too old. After reflecting on my own circumstances, I have realised that no amount of crash dieting or strict exercise regimes can facilitate sustainable change without a change of mindset. We first have to address how we perceive ourselves, why we feel and behave the way we do, and do the inner work to change how we feel about our outer shell.

Get to the core

So how did you get here, where did this body shame come from? Is it a product of ancestry, society, or some particular wound in your life? Try and get to the core of why you think the way you do about yourself. Once you understand the origin of your beliefs, you can move towards a place of acceptance. Once you accept your body as it is, you will start loving yourself and in turn, build a positive mental framework ready to embark on real physical change. You may even discover that you don’t need to change and that you are happy, just as you are.

Recognise your limitations

In our life, things happen and there are hurdles we have to overcome. Perhaps you are going through menopause and you feel like your body has just broken down, you may be going through a time of grief and loss, or perhaps have a medical condition that affects your ability to metabolise. You may have inherited a specific gene, one which means you will always be a little curvy or thin. Some things you just can’t change. It’s part of a process. Acknowledging your limitations can help you to be kinder to yourself and understand that under the circumstances you are actually doing okay.

Be kind 

When you sit on the toilet and can feel your thighs overtake the seat, try and speak love not hate. Your hater self will criticize you and fill your mind with negative stories. Instead, focus on your many other qualities and look within. When it comes to who you are, you are more than the cellulite sticking to the seat. You are a whole being with many endearing qualities. Speak to yourself like you would your best friend.

Heal from trauma

There are many factors in one’s life that cause a negative body reaction as a result. Mentally working on the experience, event or condition can help you break down the baggage your body may be storing.

Understand your habits

Some people use addiction, in whatever its form, to hide from healing themselves. As you waddle to Maccy D’s to get your Big Mac, think about why you are making that choice. Being aware and understanding your habits can help you address your deeper issues. Understanding this will help guide healthier choices and help restore your body to its natural state.

Our body is ever changing

Remember looking back at your old school photos, a time when you thought you were not good enough only to realise that time was actually when you were in your prime? Fact is our body’s age. They have been carrying us around, breathing, beating and working since we came into the world. Accepting the natural process of aging is an important step. This does not mean giving up on looking after your body but understanding that as we progress down the path our boobs will sag, our hair will grey, our abs will flab and nothing in the body is permanent.

For those suffering body shame, it’s time to try and stop (yes, this can be very hard!). Instead reflect on who you are and remember to be kind to your extraordinary body.

Finally, a shout out to all the people who love us just the way we are. It’s time to see ourselves as others see. It’s time to see the beauty and not the beast.

Life Interrupted | Life in a psychiatric facility #4

Stepping between the tiles, walking the corridors slowly, I stopped at a new painting of a flower. It wasn’t particularly beautiful, in fact, it was a poorly painted red poppy, but it reminded me of my grandmother. She always painted poppies when I was young. Her husband went to war and it felt like her tribute to his sacrifice.

I realised I had forgotten to call her on her 93rd birthday, January 31st.

Grandma was an artist. She was incredibly talented. Drawing Australian landscapes and flowers, embracing colour and passion. She moved into a nursing home, frail, sick but continued to paint. Painting kept her sane, hopeful. As she paints, each stroke kept her blood pumping and the fire burning inside her. She was stubborn, determined and strong.

One day her right arm gave up, it seized, useless and no longer allowed her to paint as she once knew. But her flame kept burning, and against all odds, she picked up a brush in her left hand and taught herself to paint again. A different style, harder to convey her vision, but she kept going.

As fortune had it, she then lost mobility in both her hands and legs. Completely immobile, she was no longer able to express her craft. Gripping her lifeline, she closed her eyes and continued to paint with her imagination. Her mind projecting extraordinary visions. She wasn’t letting go.

I realised the lessons I had learned from a strong, beautiful 93-year-old lady, laying lifeless in a hospital, continuing to paint with her mind.

One should never give up, creativity can be as powerful as oxygen and, I had to breathe mine.

I am currently working on a book regarding this topic. Any comments on this piece would be greatly appreciated. I’d love to hear from you.

What’s hot and what’s not about long distance relationships

So you’ve met your person. Things are going great. Hey, they may actually be ‘the one’ but there’s one issue. You live in vastly different postcodes! Living apart from your significant other can actually be really tough. You can find yourself wondering if it’s worth it and how will this work?

Let’s look at what’s hot and what’s not about long distance relationships.

First things first, what’s not.

Where are they?

You’ve just received great news. You want nothing more than to celebrate with your guy or gal, then with a quick reality slap you realise you can’t be with them to toast that celebratory glass of bubbles. You go to events alone, you feel part time single, and you find you miss them like hell. Being apart from your other can be really hard, especially when you experience important life events.

You’re alone

You get home from work and walk through the door wishing they were there to ask, “how was your day?”. Instead you put down your bag, pour a wine and make a meal for one telling your cat about today’s events and how you finally got that promotion.

You feel close but far

Your bond is tight but you haven’t the everyday contact like ‘normal’ couples do. When you see them you have to squeeze in everything you’ve missed into a couple of hours, trying to play catch up.

You live a double life

Your lives feel disconnected. You each have a separate life with your work, family and friends. You rarely can combine the two and it can feel like you have two lives. One with them and another living your everyday life. One you wish they could be a part of.

But there are some pros to long distance relationships and sure fire ways to make it work.

Your own time

Both a blessing and a curse, living apart from your other can force you to be by yourself. You have time to pursue your own activities, goals and wants. This can be extremely liberating as it gives you the time to live the life you want and a chance to look after yourself and be the best person you can be for you and your partner.

Moments become magical

When you do see each other it’s a special experience. You make every moment count and don’t take each other for granted. You catch up on all that you have missed and are positively thrilled to be with each other, even just for a moment.

The special bond

Being away from each other forces you to connect in other ways. Provided you make time to talk, you are forced to communicate on a regular, open and deep level. You find yourself knowing so much about each other so when you do get together, it’s as if you haven’t been apart.

Can long distance relationships work? Yes. But it involves committed communication, sharing everyday experiences, compromise, honesty, trusting the other and knowing that this is just one chapter to what could be a very happy life together.

As they say, distance can make the heart grow fonder. Enjoy both your freedom and the moments you share.

Be your own best friend

There are times we can feel a little broken and can be incredibly hard on ourselves. Sometimes we feel we aren’t good enough or can’t seem to do anything right and we spiral thinking we are alone in this feeling. Everyone else seems so together right? What’s wrong with me? Why can’t I get myself together?

There is a concept that some of us know but don’t apply enough and the truth is it can be incredibly effective. That is, be your own best friend. But how do we do this when we feel low. How can we love ourselves just like we love our besties?

You said what?

How are you speaking to yourself? Would you say these things to your best mate? I’m certain some of your self talk i.e I’m not worthy, I’m too fat/skinny or I am not good enough, would not fly if you were saying it to your best friend. Think kindness, non judgement, and be loving in the way you speak to yourself. Tell yourself ‘it’s going to be okay’, ‘I’m here for you’ and ‘you’re not alone’. No more hate talk. You wouldn’t say it to someone else so don’t put yourself down.

Self care baby!

What would you do if you were with your best friend? What makes you feel good? Self care is all about doing things just for you. And no, it’s not selfish! Take yourself for brunch, have a bath, go to that movie, get a massage, walk the beach, go to the gym, cook a healthy meal. Do anything you know is good for your body, mind and soul. It is a sure guarantee to lift your mood and a much better alternative to sitting home stewing over how much you feel like you are failing.

What’s my good qualities?

Now this can be a hard one but try and acknowledge your good qualities. What would your best friend say about you. Try saying it to yourself. List five, maybe, ‘I’m caring, intuitive, determined, funny and resilient’. It’s also important to realise sometimes what we see as our bad qualities can actually be our best. Okay maybe you feel you’re too shy, too reactive, too sensitive but try and reframe these positively. Perhaps you are instead independent, passionate and empathetic. Feeling fat? Hey, curves are sexy. Talk to your body and acknowledge what an amazing vessel it actually is!

Being your own best friend can be one of the best skills you can learn. At the end of the day we are all living with ourselves and our own thoughts about who we are. Wouldn’t it be cool to just love hanging out with yourself, completely content knowing you were never alone, as long as you had your fabulous self to rely on.

Be you’re own best friend and you will shine.

Life Interrupted | Life in a psychiatric facility #2

I noticed by week five in the facility I started to do odd things. I was moulding into the beige, peeling walls. Everyone knew me and I was forming some attachments. I longed for progress but honestly felt like I was drifting more into insanity.

I would circle the hospital, pace and critique every artwork and ensure it was straight. There were endless prints of Monet. Those damn water lilies. Sometimes I would make each piece crooked and straighten them again on my next lap, just for something to do. I was bored. I’d wave at the cameras. I knew I must look insane. Was I?

Life in the facility had become monotonous. Wake, eat, medication, eat, group therapy, eat, pace, eat and then again after more medication, eat. I was getting fat. I would wobble more as I paced. And, every day was the same. Every day was vanilla.

I would sort through the health brochures and chuck those that were out of date, just to be helpful. I would change signs that were spelt wrong, just to be helpful. I would take my blood pressure and that of other patients, just to be helpful. I sorted through DVD collections, and placed them all in genre and alphabetical order. I was aware I was losing my mind. My mask was dropping. I started not to care.

One night I watched a couple of patients play Chess in the dining room. I had no idea what was happening, I didn’t know the rules but just sat and stared. It was something to do. One of the men looked rough, upkept, dangerous. He smelt of stale whiskey and smoke. He carried a tin, I didn’t know what was in it. I asked him where he learnt to play.

“In jail”, he replied.

I didn’t bat an eye lid. I picked up my ham and cheese sandwich and waddled to my room.

What was in his tin? It didn’t matter. I realised I had reached the point. I was desensitised.

I am currently working on a book regarding this topic. Any comments on this piece would be greatly appreciated. I’d love to hear from you.

What’s Hot and What’s Not about the honeymoon period  

So you’ve scored yourself a significant other. Things are going well and you find yourself in uninterrupted romantic bliss. The honeymoon period, which typically lasts 6-12 months, can be the most exciting. You’re getting to know one another, you’re spending quality time together and you may be pinching yourself to believe that it is actually real. But, the honeymoon period can turn your world upside down. Keeping the vibe alive can be hard work. Let’s look at what’s hot and what’s not about the honeymoon period. 

Maintaining the goddess

He’s just phoned to surprise you and announces he will be at your house in 10 minutes! You haven’t washed your hair in four days, you’ve just eaten a garlic infused yiros, and you’ve been cleaning the bathroom in your 10 year old sweatpants. Time is ticking and you have moments to transform into a goddess (heaven forbid he sees you just as you are!) You run to the shower, wash your hair whilst frantically maintaining ‘Nut Bush City’. Your stress levels have peaked. You throw on a dress, chuck on some bronzer and scrounge through your washing basket for your sexiest knickers. Knock on the door, he’s here, you take a deep breath and greet him with an adoring kiss. He compliments you and you’re like “Oh this old thing, I’m sorry I’m a little daggy”. Little does he know the rapid effort you have expelled to look ‘effortlessly beautiful’.

Toilet dilemmas

You’ve been out for dinner and mistakenly eaten that amazing green curry that you know definitely doesn’t agree with you. You’re freaking out knowing that he’s going to want to come back to your place. You get home, passionately kissing, and then your stomach starts to twist. Oh no, not now! You dash to the bathroom and search for some Imodium but it’s too late. Even worse you forgot to buy air freshener this week. You need him out. Stat. It’s too soon for such exposure. You think of an excuse for him to leave as your intestines contract uncontrollably. He’s left, you close the door and run to the loo. You sit there, you just make it. Phew! Close call.

Just a salad, thanks

Your former single self would order Uber Eats a couple of times a week. Why not? You are the only one seeing yourself in your birthday suit. But now it’s different. Your stomach is full of butterflies and you know there is a likely chance that someone else is going to see you naked. You both go out for dinner and you pick at a salad. You want to be a skinny minny for the big event. You’ve starved yourself for days, living off crackers and water. You wonder if he can notice? Suddenly it’s time, you’re about to do the deed. And then, overcome with complete malnutrition….you faint.

What’s sleep?

You’re staying over at your new boo’s house. It’s exciting, no more nights alone. Finally. But, you can’t sleep. You’re used to sleeping alone. He seems to have drifted off quickly. He’s even orchestrated a slight, rhythmic snore. You’re wrapped up in each other’s arms. Yes, it feels nice. But, you usually sleep on your side! You eventually make a move to the other side of the bed; he wakes and thinks you want to do the deed again, so you do. Then he drifts off within moments and you have to start the whole process again.

The honeymoon period can be the best time in your relationship. But, after this stage can be even better. You feel comfortable, at ease and can just be you… sweatpants, no make up, eating takeaway and bingeing on Netflix. The right person will love you for you (yes, even if you do ‘number twos’) so relax, be authentic and enjoy the ride!